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  • Poster Group A - Interprofessional Education
  • Poster Group A - Interprofessional Education

    PO A1 - IPE: Screening, Brief Intervention, and Referral to Treatment (SBIRT) as a Framework for Interprofessional Education

    Tuesday, June 06, 2017 1:00 PM - Tuesday, June 06, 2017 1:45 PM

    Plaza Ballroom

    Abstract Short Title

    SBIRT and IPE

    Introduction

    The need for more efficient care systems and improved collaboration is established, and has led to mandates for Interprofessional Education. The resources and logistics of a community hospital can be challenged when designing interprofessional educational opportunities. By selecting IPEC competencies to accompany an established uniprofessional activity and involving multiple relevant professions, rich IPE opportunities can be created, by consciously restructuring the brief and debrief.

    Project Description

    The SBIRT curriculum at Danbury Hospital incorporates three SP scenarios, about drug seeking behavior and alcohol abuse with the explicit objective if improving motivational interviewing (MI) technique, a skill that is useful for and used by several professions. Although the activity, as conducted, was interprofessional in the nature of its faculty, the application of it was designed around one clinician performing each encounter individually, receiving feedback after each encounter.

    After observing the similarity of the approach across a few professions, we sought to create an interprofessional education activity without making any changes to the scenarios themselves. This was piloted with 6 teams, each consisting of a social worker, medical resident, and nurse practitioner student. Each team member took the lead an encounter, while the other two members observed. All members were present for the debriefing and feedback sessions with a faculty member and SP.

    Outcomes

    Evaluations of the activity as a team activity, revealed that there was no difference in the level of engagement or impact of the activity performed by the team of three as compared to the individual and independent activity of a single learner doing all three. Participants observed that it was beneficial to observe how other clinicians approached motivational interviewing and felt that observing their interactions had a positive impact on acquiring the new skill set. In the debriefing, most participants noted the significant clinical role overlap they had observed.

    Conclusions / Discussion Overview

    This successful pilot demonstrated how an activity can be restructured around IPE competencies in a manner that did not require any change in the bulk of the learning activity. It would seem that the adaptation did not detract from meeting the clinically specific IM objectives, however, further measurement of this is necessary.

    Reference 1

    Gotham H, Knopf-Amelung S, Haggins I, et al. Interprofessional approaches to integrating SBIRT into students’ clinical experiences. Addiction Science & Clinical Practice. 2015

    Reference 2

    Paul F. Cook, Saman Manzouri, Laurra Aagaard, Lindsay O’Connell, Marla Corwin, and Bonnie Gance-Cleveland. Results From 10 Years of Interprofessional Training on Motivational Interviewing Eval Health Prof .2016

    PO A2 - STIER:  Simulate to Increase Engagement in Research

    Tuesday, June 06, 2017 1:00 PM - Tuesday, June 06, 2017 1:45 PM

    Plaza Ballroom

    Abstract Short Title

    STIER

    Introduction

    “The diversity of the American population is one of the Nation’s greatest assets, one of its greatest challenges in reducing the profound disparity in health status of its racial and ethnic minority, rural, low—income, and other undeserved populations” (NIH, 2016). The simulation program partnered with Research Centers in Minority Institutions (RCMI) to stimulate healthcare student interest in conducting health disparities research. RCMI’s program focuses on enhancement and further development of necessary research infrastructure of those diseases which disproportionately affect disadvantaged and minority population. Funded by a grant, the programs designed health disparities simulation workshops targeting medical and dental students specifically to increase their awareness and interest in health disparities research.

    Project Description

    Two simulation workshops focusing on health disparities were designed. Workshop I focused on patient & team based provider interactions (manikin-based). Workshop II focused on patient & individual provider interactions (standardized patient-based). The goal was to provide student attendees with ‘up-close’ and realistic views of what health disparities may look like from the patient’s perspective. The scenarios demonstrated socioeconomic, cultural and bias-based dynamics of the patient, provider and healthcare system interactions in multiple healthcare settings. The workshop objectives were to demonstrate the impact of health disparities on issues around:

    • efficiency of healthcare access
    • trust in the healthcare system
    • understanding of healthcare information
    • appropriate utilization of healthcare information
    The workshops were two-hour in length. The students watched in real-time and videotaped interactions. Each workshop included a moderator to facilitate student dialog in discussing both the inappropriate and appropriate scenario depictions. For workshop II, the students had an opportunity to hear directly from the patient during debrief how they felt as they received disparate care.

    Outcomes

    There were 40 medical and dental students who attended both workshops. Of the 40 students, 5% have actively engaged in health disparities research opportunities.

    Conclusions / Discussion Overview

    Overall, the workshops were effective in increasing interest in health disparities research. 89% of the students agreed the workshops were well organized, the content appropriate, and met objectives. The students’ commented that “it is important to build relationships with other health professionals besides those in my specific profession.”

    Reference 1

    “Disparities”  HealthyPeople.gov. https://www.healthypeople.gov/2020/about/foundation-health-measures/Disparities . Accessed 19 October 2016

    Reference 2

    National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities.  http://www.nimhd.nih.gov/about/overview/ .  Accessed 19 October 2016.

    PO A3 - Collaboration Between a Medical School and a Community College to Deliver an Ultrasound Enriched Curriculum

    Tuesday, June 06, 2017 1:00 PM - Tuesday, June 06, 2017 1:45 PM

    Plaza Ballroom

    Abstract Short Title

    Collaboratively Delivering an Ultrasound Curriculum

    Introduction

    Our medical School is currently in the fifth year of creating a four year vertical Ultrasound enhanced curriculum. During initial planning the planning committee chair reached out to the local community college. The community college houses a well established Diagnostic Medical Sonography program with capable faculty and leadership interested in pursuing a collaborative relationship with our medical school.

    Project Description

    Although few medical schools reach out to local sonography programs, they can be a source of both equipment for newly established programs as well as a source for teaching assistants with a good, solid working knowledge of sonography techniques.

    Outcomes

    Conference Members will see the benefits of inter-institutional collaboration through the stated outcomes between the two institutions. These include:

    1. The community college was able to provide portable, state-of-art Ultrasound systems for use in medical school student training sessions as our medical school established their own internal resources.
    2. A medical school affiliated physician now serves as an active medical advisor to the community college sonography program and gives regular lectures to the Ultrasound students.
    3. Community College faculty were all awarded adjunct faculty status at the medical school.
    4. There is an increased awareness of sonographers and their advanced skill set by medical students and medical faculty.
    5. There is an increased sense of confidence in the community college students that is gained by working with the staff physicians, residents, fellows, and medical students, and a growing awareness nationally that sonographers and sonography students are often overlooked as an important resource for local medical schools.

    Conclusions / Discussion Overview

    Our medical school has established a beneficial collaboration with a local community college. Both partners have The medical students and community college students make positive comments about working together. There are important considerations when establishing a collaborative partnership, but many community colleges may be able too help medical schools overcome common roadblocks when adding Ultrasound components into their curriculum.

    Reference 1

    Hoppmann RA, Rao VV, Poston MB, et. al. An Integrated Ultrasound Curriculum (iUSC) for Medical Students: 4-Year Experience. Critical Ultrasound Journal 2011; 3:1-12.

    Reference 2

    Kessler C, Bhandarkar S. The Need for Education in Ultrasonography. Medical Teacher 2009; 31:1094-1098.

    Reference 3

    Rao S, Holsbeeck LV, Musial JL, Parker A, Bouffard JA, Bridge P, Jackson M, Dulchavsky SA. A Pilot Study of Comprehensive Ultrasound Education at the Wayne State University School of Medicine. Journal of Ultrasound in Medicine 2008; 27:745-749.

    Reference 4

    Akhtar S, Theodoro D, Gaspari R, Tayal V, Sierzenski P, LaMantia J, Stahmer S, Raio C. Resident Training in Emergency Ultrasound: Consensus Recommendations from the 2008 Council of Emergency Medicine Residency Directors Conference. Academic Emergency Medicine 2009; 16 (12):S32-36.

    Reference 5

    Arger PH, Schultz SM, Shehgal CM, Cary TW, Aronchick J. Teaching Medical Students Diagnostic Sonography. Journal of Ultrasound in Medicine 2005; 24:1365-1369.